Best Digital Door Locks: Keyless Entry Options for Your Home

best digital door locksHow often do you come home with your hands full? Or maybe you’re like me, and you manage to lock yourself out of your own house at least once per month. With a digital door lock, that isn’t a problem—the one thing I never forget is my phone.

What sets digital locks apart from standard locks is how easy they are to use. Some digital locks work with your smartphone, some have digital keypads, and some have both. You can set digital locks to unlock when you come within a certain proximity of the lock or when you give a command from your phone. With digital locks, you can grant temporary access to the housekeeper or save yourself from fiddling with your keys in the rain with the touch of a button.

The best digital door locks #1-#5

We took a look at 10 of the best digital door locks (skip to picks #6-#10) on the market, their features, and what other customers had to say about them. Here’s what we found.

Ranking#1#2#3#4#5
Product nameAugust Smart LockSchlage Connect TouchscreenKwikset Smartcode Touchscreen DeadboltPolyControl Danalock V2 BTKwikset Kevo Touch-to-Open Smart Lock
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automationAmazon Alexa, HomeKit, IFTTT, NestZ-Wave, Wink, SmartThingsAmazon Alexa, SmartThings, Wink, Z-WaveZ-Wave, ZigBee, NestNest, SkyBell, IFTTT
Guest access
Ranking #1
Product name
August Smart Lock
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
Amazon Alexa, HomeKit, IFTTT, Nest
Guest access
Ranking #2
Product name
Schlage Connect Touchscreen
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
Z-Wave, Wink, SmartThings
Guest access
Ranking #3
Product name
Kwikset Smartcode Touchscreen Deadbolt
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
Amazon Alexa, SmartThings, Wink, Z-Wave
Guest access
Ranking #4
Product name
PolyControl Danalock V2 BT
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
Z-Wave, ZigBee, Nest
Guest access
Ranking #5
Product name
Kwikset Kevo Touch-to-Open Smart Lock
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
Nest, SkyBell, IFTTT
Guest access

#1 August Smart Lock

August Smart LockThe August Smart Lock has appeared in our rankings before as our top pick for Bluetooth smart locks. With no keyhole at all, it sets itself apart from many of the locks on this list. A digital code (key) is assigned to each person with access to the lock, allowing it to keep an accurate log of who enters or leaves and at what times. You can monitor who has access to your home via your smartphone, and you can also remotely unlock the door with a press of a button. These features make the August perfect for people who have a cleaning service or dog sitter, because even if you’re out of town, you can grant people access without compromising the security of your home.

The August Smart Lock is compatible with Amazon Alexa, Apple HomeKit, IFTTT, and Nest. It can also be connected to both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. While around $230 is a steep price for a lock, the convenience and wide array of features more than justify it. While the August isn’t immediately compatible with our top picks for home security companies (Frontpoint, Link Interactive, and Protect America), a new version called the August Smart Lock Pro is on the horizon and is Z-Wave compatible, meaning it will work with these systems.

Pricing and tech specs

  • Price: Check Amazon for current price
  • Dimensions: 3.2 in x 2.2 in
  • Home automation compatibility: Amazon Alexa, Apple HomeKit, IFTTT, Nest

Pros

  • Auto-lock and unlock features
  • Wide range of home automation integration

Cons

  • High price
  • Need for additional parts to enable remote locking

#2 Schlage Connect Touchscreen Deadbolt

Schlage Connect LockThe Schlage Camelot doesn’t have as many bells and whistles as the August does, but it makes up for it by doing a few things particularly well.

The Schlage has three distinct alarm modes (Activity, Tamper, and Forced Entry) that can be triggered from the moment the door handle is touched until it opens. If someone tries to get into your home without the proper code, you’ll receive an alert on your smartphone. The Schlage can store up to 30 personalized codes at a time, so everyone who needs access to your home can have it. And because the codes are personalized, you’ll know who uses which code.

Z-Wave compatibility means you can connect to the lock remotely and lock or unlock the door from your phone or the web. It also means that the Camelot is compatible with Frontpoint, Link Interactive, and Protect America for home automation integration. The price of just under $200 is a good entry point into the world of smart locks—not too expensive, but priced competitively.

Pricing and tech specs

  • Price: Check Amazon for current price
  • Dimensions: 5.12 in x 4.5 in x 9.25 in
  • Home automation compatibility: Z-Wave, Samsung SmartThings, Wink

Pros

  • Smudge-resistant touch screen
  • 30 personalized codes
  • Built-in alarm

Cons

  • Short battery life

#3 Kwikset 916 SmartCode Touchscreen Deadbolt

Kwikset 916 SmartCode Touchscreen DeadboltThe Kwikset 916 is very similar to the Schlage Camelot in multiple ways. Not only does it hold 30 user codes, but it too is Z-Wave compatible. The Kwikset’s range of compatibility is also a major boon: it works with Amazon Alexa, Samsung SmartThings, and Wink. The Kwikset will lock automatically after 30 seconds of inactivity, providing an extra sense of security that your door is never unlocked for long. If you need to reset the keys, the Kwikset makes it easy to rekey the lock.

A unique feature of the Kwikset is its fire resistance—it’s rated for up to 20 minutes in a blaze before the lock fails, providing a durability not found in other locks. You can connect the Kwikset 916 to your existing Frontpoint, Link Interactive, or Protect America system through Z-Wave integration.

Pricing and tech specs

  • Price: Check Amazon for current price
  • Dimensions: 5.38 in x 3.5 in x 9.88 in
  • Home automation compatibility: Z-Wave, Amazon Alexa, Samsung SmartThings, Wink

Pros

  • 30 personalized codes
  • Autolock feature
  • Easy rekey feature

Cons

  • Need for 4 AA batteries

#4 PolyControl Danalock V2 BT

Danalock V2 BTThe PolyControl Danalock V2 is a close relative to the August in terms of design. It carries the same sleek, aesthetic look despite being produced by a different company. Users of the previous Danalock might remember complaints about the mobile app, but the new version has a completely redesigned interface that makes it much easier to use.

An interesting note about the Danalock is its ability to sync with Airbnb properties—if you rent your home out through the service, you can send personalized keys to tenants remotely. It’s compatible with Z-Wave and ZigBee home automation systems, though it’s worth noting that the V2 B2 model isn’t Z-Wave compatible, but the BTZE model is.

Pricing and tech specs

Pros

  • Completely redesigned interface from earlier version
  • Airbnb integration

Cons

  • Occasionally stiff manual rotation

#5 Kwikset Kevo Touch-to-Open Smart Lock

Kwikset Kevo Touch-to-Open Smart LockKwikset locks appear a few times on this list, which is a testament to their quality. The Kevo Touch-to-Open Smart Lock uses a key fob. While you can use a physical key to override and open the lock, you can also open the lock simply by tapping it with the fob. Alternatively, you can open the lock using your smartphone—you get two “e-keys” you can give to guests to open the lock. The Kevo keeps a log of when it is opened and closed, so you can keep track of who comes and goes.

The Kevo connects to the Nest, some Honeywell thermostats, and the Amazon and SkyBell video doorbells. You can also set up IFTTT recipes. The downside to this lock is that if you want to access and control your lock remotely, you’ll have to pay an additional $99. The Kevo has a lot of great features, but the price of about $230 is a bit steep for a lock that requires an extra purchase for remote access.

Pricing and tech specs

  • Price: Check Amazon for current price
  • Dimensions: 5.7 in x 2.7 in x 1.5 in
  • Home automation compatibility: Nest, SkyBell, IFTTT

Pros

  • Responsive interface
  • Wide range of integration with other devices

Cons

  • High price
  • Expensive remote access costs—nearly half the original purchase price

Best Digital Door Locks #6-#10

Ranking#6#7#8#9#10
Product nameLockitron BoltSchlage SenseYale AssureKwikset 909 SmartCodeSchlage Camelot Keypad
Product imagelockitron bolt
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Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automationNoneApple HomeKitZ-Wave, ZigBee, Apple HomeKitNoneNone
Guest access
Ranking #6
Product name
Lockitron Bolt
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lockitron bolt
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
None
Guest access
Ranking #7
Product name
Schlage Sense
Product image
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Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
Apple HomeKit
Guest access
Ranking #8
Product name
Yale Assure
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
Z-Wave, ZigBee, Apple HomeKit
Guest access
Ranking #9
Product name
Kwikset 909 SmartCode
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
None
Guest access
Ranking #10
Product name
Schlage Camelot Keypad
Product image
View product
Touchpad
Geo-fencing
Home automation
None
Guest access

#6 Lockitron Bolt

lockitron bolt
The largest inhibition many people have when shopping for a digital lock is the cost. The majority are well over $100, and this is where the Lockitron shines. At just $99, it’s certainly an affordable digital smart lock. However, like the old saying goes, you get what you pay for. That’s not to say the Lockitron is a bad option, but it lacks a lot of the features you might expect. For example, there is no home automation integration. It also works only within Bluetooth range unless you spend an additional $79 for the Wi-Fi bridge.

You can assign guest privileges, know who unlocks your door as soon as they do, and unlock your door, even in a power outage. While the Bolt’s Sense feature can unlock the door as soon as you’re within range, it doesn’t automatically lock behind you. This seems like a strange oversight by Lockitron, but as long as you remember to lock the door when you leave, it isn’t necessarily a deal-breaker.

Pricing and tech specs

  • Price: $99
  • Dimensions: 1.1 in x 7 inch x 2.75 in
  • Home automation integration: None

Pros

  • Low cost
  • Auto-unlock feature based on proximity

Cons

  • No home automation
  • No auto lock
  • High cost for Wi-Fi bridge

#7 Schlage Sense

Schlage SenseThe Schlage Sense is tied with the August Smart Lock and the Kevo for the highest-priced item on this list. However, it has the functionality to back up the price. At the most basic level, the Schlage is a touchpad deadbolt with a built-in alarm and a low-battery alert. Beyond that, the Sense is capable of storing up to 30 unique access codes and setting up specific windows when those codes will work. The Sense can be locked with a single touch of a key, and the autolock feature lets you know the door is always locked.

The Sense is compatible with Apple HomeKit, but this brings up one of its most glaring flaws: it’s only compatible with iOS devices. If you have an iPhone or an iPad (or an iPod), you’re good to go. You can lock and unlock your door via voice commands through Siri. In addition to HomeKit, the Sense can link with the Philips Hue light system, the ecobee3 thermostat, the Nest, and the Canary all-in-one home security system.

Pricing and tech specs

  • Price: Check Amazon for current price
  • Dimensions: 5 in x 3 in x 0.6 in
  • Home automation integration: Apple HomeKit, Philips Hue, ecobee3, Nest, Canary

Pros

  • Built-in alarm
  • Ability to respond to voice commands

Cons

  • High price
  • Compatibility only with iOS devices
  • Inability to be controlled remotely without Apple TV
  • Z-Wave support

#8 Yale Assure

Yale Assure LockThe Yale Assure might be the most digital of all the locks on this list. It doesn’t have a key—of any kind. There’s not even a cylinder built into the lock. Instead, you use a digital key on your smartphone. You hold your phone up and twist it 90 degrees, then tap the touchpad when the check appears. Awkward? Maybe a bit, but it’s certainly different from other locks on the market. If your phone is dead, you can enter your passcode (a four- to eight-digit code) on the built-in touchscreen.

Another notable feature of this lock is that it has two separate price points. The Bluetooth-only version of the lock is around $200, but if you want to integrate it with your ZigBee or Z-Wave (and as of March 2017, Apple HomeKit) system, you’ll have to pay about $50 extra for the more expensive version. That’s a pretty steep price for a lock with relatively few features.

You can have up to 12 separate codes to grant guests access, but each code after the fifth is an additional $2. The lock gives a low-battery warning, but if you miss that and the lock runs out of juice anyway, all you have to do is hold a nine-volt battery to the terminals on the underside of the lock and enter your passcode. Because the Yale Assure is Z-Wave compatible, it can integrate with Frontpoint, Link Interactive, and Protect America.

Pricing and tech specs

  • Price: Check Amazon for current price
  • Dimensions: 3.75 in x 4 in x 6.75 in
  • Home automation compatibility: ZigBee, Z-Wave, Apple HomeKit (with higher price-point only)

Pros

  • No key cylinder, so no chance of being picked
  • Lockout safety features

Cons

  • High price
  • No autolock feature

#9 Kwikset 909 SmartCode

Kwikset 909 SmartCodeThe Kwikset 909 is much more bare bones than many of the other locks on this list. It lacks any home automation integration, but what it lacks in fancy features it more than makes up for in simplicity and affordability. At just less than $100, the Kwikset 909 is one of the least expensive locks on this list. The 909 has two customizable access codes: one for family and one for guest access. The deadbolt will also automatically lock your door after 30 seconds of no activity.

If you move or lose your key and need to rekey your Kwikset 909, it’s easy to do. The lock is advertised as requiring only three steps to complete the rekeying process. The Kwikset 909 also comes with BumpGuard, a patented Kwikset technology that protects against lock bumping (a lock-picking technique using a specially crafted key). The only potential downside is the four AA battery requirement—these batteries may not have as long a lifespan as you need. You’ll need to keep an eye out for low-battery alerts so you don’t get locked out of your home. The lock is also ANSI Grade 2, which means it can be picked more easily than a Grade 1 lock.

Pricing and tech specs

Pros

  • BumpGuard protection against lock bumping
  • One-touch locking
  • Autolock after 30 seconds

Cons

  • No home automation integration
  • ANSI Grade 2 safety rating

#10 Schlage BE365 Keypad Deadbolt

Schlage BE365 Keypad DeadboltThe Schlage BE365 is much like the Kwikset 909 in its limited functionality. Rather than focusing on the smart features of a door lock, the Schlage BE365 prioritizes security above all else. The Schlage comes pre-equipped with a preset six-digit programming code and two preset four-digit user codes but has a total capacity of up to 19 codes. This means you can easily set guest access codes. The keypad is weather resistant and coated with silicon, so the numbers won’t wear off. Aside from looking nice, this coating makes it much more difficult for would-be thieves to determine your code based on wear.

You don’t need a key to get in, either. Just press the Schlage button at the top of the lock, enter your user code, and twist the lock itself from there. The lock is ANSI grade 2, and batteries are estimated to last for three years.

Pricing and tech specs

Pros

  • Up to 19 codes
  • Weather-resistant keys
  • Three-year battery life

Cons

  • No home automation
  • ANSI Grade 2 safety rating

What to look for in a digital or smart door lock

digital keypad door lockIt’s easy to get caught up in the hype of buying a smart door lock, but there are a few things you need to keep in mind. The first and most important is your door. Take a look at it—does your existing deadbolt open and close smoothly, or do you need to push or pull the door? If there is any resistance or improper alignment on the door, you should address that first, or else your digital lock may not function properly.

You should also think about who will be using the lock. Do you have a dog walker or a cleaner who needs access to your home on a routine basis? You can grant them their own access codes on specific locks and keep track of when they arrive and when they leave. If you need the lock only for yourself and your family, you might not need as many access codes.

If you have existing home automation equipment, decide whether you want to connect your door lock to them. For example, opening your door might trigger the lights in your home to come on. Or maybe you could give a voice command to Siri to unlock your door.

Finally, remember that a smart lock is more convenient than a traditional deadbolt, but it’s not always more secure. Many smart locks have a lower ANSI grades than traditional deadbolts, which makes them more susceptible to lock picking and bumping.

Are smart locks worth it?

From the August Smart Lock to the most basic Kwikset deadbolt, the options for digital locks can be overwhelming. You may also think it’s silly to spend the same amount on a lock that you might spend on a very nice date, but whether the locks are worth it or not is based on your needs. Take the time to evaluate whether you need the enhanced functionality of a smart lock. Do you want your home to open automatically when you come within range? Maybe you don’t like leaving a key in a hiding spot for your babysitter, or you’ve forgotten to lock the door one too many times.

Whatever your reason, smart locks can be infinitely more convenient than traditional deadbolts. Examine your door, your lifestyle, and the common concerns you run into with your existing lock to decide whether it’s time to upgrade to something a bit smarter.